Squrlz4Ever

Registered bored user

You lookin' at me?

squrlz4ever wrote:
Ow. It makes me uncomfortable just to look at that. I feel like I need an anatomist and some x-rays to explain how this is possible. I'd guess he's dividing the 180 degree rotation among his hip, knee, and ankle joints (60 degrees each?), but even then I don't see how one of those joints can rotate sideways that far without the joint becoming dislocated. Weird.
squrlz4ever wrote:
prichards114 Yes... yes, I can see that. I thought the sweetest of the lot, in terms of partnership material, was the woman in the black Columbia sportswear fleece. She didn't deserve the "six dicks" comment; I felt badly for her then. Also: The two nerds were a match made in Heaven. LOL.
squrlz4ever wrote:
zeegrr Despite all the static, real discussions do occur on here from time to time. And while you clearly think otherwise, some people's ideas and thinking are influenced by such discussions. Hard to believe, I know, but it does happen.
squrlz4ever wrote:
I call rebound dibs on the blonde in the khaki-colored jacket!
squrlz4ever wrote:
Gerry1of1 LOL! Sounds you've got a whole ecosystem flourishing down there. I look forward to a monograph in Nature. ... But don't even think about donating that collection to Squrlz University!
squrlz4ever wrote:
Gerry1of1 Wull, they were for this couple, Mr. Wisenheimer. ~drops boll weevil down Gerry's shorts~
squrlz4ever wrote:
taxidriver You've definitely got the part about the golden goose right. Here are the yearly salaries of some of America's health care CEO's:

Leonard S. Schleifer, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals: $47.46 million
Jeffrey M. Leiden, Vertex Pharmaceuticals: $28.09 million
Larry J. Merlo, CVS Health: $22.86 million
Robert J. Hugin, Celgene: $22.47 million
Alex Gorsky, Johnson & Johnson: $21.13 million
Michael F. Neidorff, Centene: $20.76 million
Alan B. Miller, Universal Health Services: $20.43 million
Kenneth C. Frazier, Merck: $19.89 million
Miles D. White, Abbott Laboratories: $19.41 million
John C. Martin, Gilead Sciences: $18.76 million
David Cordan, Cigna: $17.3 million
Mark Bertolini, Aetna: $17.3 million
Stephen Hemsley, UnitedHealth: $14.5 million
Joseph Swedish, Anthem: $13.6 million
Bruce Broussard, Humana: $10.3 million

Can you imagine clocking in a 40-hour work week, with a chauffeured company car and two secretaries to do your shopping and make your dinner reservations--and collecting a paycheck every two weeks for $1.8 million?

These are the noble Americans who hire a small army of lobbyists to ensure that they remain obscenely compensated while most Americans pay far too much for health care and prescription drugs.

A few days ago, an IAB'er on here was complaining that the EPA is paying scientists with Masters degrees and PhD's $70K per year--as if it were the scientists of the middle and upper-middle class who are the problem.

I'm a lot more outraged by these health care CEO salaries than anything paid to an EPA employee.
squrlz4ever wrote:
There's a saying, often attributed to Winston Churchill, that goes, "Americans can be counted on to do the right thing--once they've exhausted every other alternative." Maybe, just maybe, America will eventually come to its senses and realize that we can provide better health care at lower cost by finally instituting national health care. Anyone who wants bells and whistles such as elective cosmetic surgery or cutting-edge treatments could supplement their essential health care with private plans. But for the basic broken-bones, brass-tacks health care that 99% of our citizens need? National health care would be a huge leap forward.

And before anybody goes on an extended rant about me not understanding health care, I've had medical care in four countries: The U.S., Switzerland, Finland, and Thailand. I have more first-paw experience of health care systems than most. And I'm here to tell you, our for-profit system is inordinately expensive and wrapped up in a Byzantine maze of insurance paperwork, medical codes, and absurd billing practices. In most instances--anything not cutting-edge--I'd rather be treated in Switzerland or Finland than over here any day of the week.
squrlz4ever wrote:
normalfreak2 Glad you liked it. I found their stories inspiring on so many levels. Talk about lives well spent!
squrlz4ever wrote:
Zoom, that went up fast. Thanks, Fancy. One error: The O'Briens have donated their collection to Arizona State University, not the University of Arizona. (My mistake: Sorry!)
squrlz4ever wrote:
Ugh. It is so painful to watch the consequences of stupid people being in positions of power. I'd've been in trouble myself if such policies existed during my early school years. Every young squirrel knew back then that a .22 casing makes a great whistle (you just blow over the top).
squrlz4ever wrote:
~Whispers~ Space gophers.
squrlz4ever wrote:
kalron27 Darn that Fancylad! Always sneaking secret messages and references into the content. *heh heh*
squrlz4ever wrote:
This guy has talent. Good job, Mr. Hamburger Guy.
squrlz4ever wrote:
thezigrat I could be wrong, but isn't this the soundtrack to the "Hello, stranger" video?
squrlz4ever wrote:
monkerz Are you an American? If so, it might behoove you to learn what the metaphor of the melting pot refers to. Hint: It has nothing to do with cooking, as you seem to think.
squrlz4ever wrote:
Just as long as a voice doesn't come out of nowhere and say, "Hello, stranger. Go ahead, you can look at my butt if you want."
squrlz4ever wrote:
melcervini Thanks, Mel. You definitely make a lot of valid points there. I do think a lot of people are very resistant to confronting the dangers of radical Islamic fundamentalism, and I'm not sure why.
squrlz4ever wrote:
LOL! Take a look at the eyes in that mugshot. I see not one iota of remorse. More like, "It was so worth it!"
squrlz4ever wrote:
melcervini Mel, it would help if you would put your thoughts into words. It seems a few of us are left guessing as to what you're thinking, based on the images. If you can put your thoughts in words, people can respond with either a "Yeah, you're right," "I disagree because...," or an "I don't know." Anyone of those exchanges is better than the "?" responses the photos and screenshots are eliciting.
squrlz4ever wrote:
piperfawn LOL! So do I, Piper! LOL!
squrlz4ever wrote:
Fascinating. I had no idea that there were sweat and oil pores running along the top of the human fingerprint ridges. This really helps you understand how fingerprints occur.

Fur is much cuter.
squrlz4ever wrote:
O.O  Two words come to mind here: "Stranger danger."